You are currently viewing From High Finances to Opal Mining – this is Robyn Carmichael’s extraordinary story

From High Finances to Opal Mining – this is Robyn Carmichael’s extraordinary story

Stories From The Bush – Our Stories are from our community of Spend With Us – Buy From a Bush Business, stories of Australian’s who work and live in Rural and Regional Australia.

Robyn Carmichael used to be in finance but after life threw her some lemons, she made lemonade in the form of opal jewellery – mined by herself.

A Spend With Us – Buy From a Bush Business, Business Owner’s Story

 

Today we chat with Robyn from Winton in Queensland about Opal Mining and jewellery creation.

This transcript was made by Rev.com – if you’d like to try it yourself click here: try.rev.com/3mmN2z

Transcript:

Jenn Donovan:

Why hey there, welcome to episode seven of The Stories From the Bush Podcast. I am of course, the host Jenn Donovan, marketer, keynote speaker, social media strategist, and rural girl pretty much obsessed with just helping other Australian rural small businesses. I’m a farmer’s wife in the Riverina of New South Wales, mom of three, and so passionate about sharing these stories of business and life in rural Australia.

Jenn Donovan:

My business partners and I, Sarah Britz and Lauren Hateley, shout out to you amazing girls, are the co-founders of Spend With Us Buy From a Bush Business. If you want to hear more about our story, how a clinical psychologist, a web designer and a marketer came together to create this movement, then head back to our intro episode and hear how three rural girls got together to make a big difference in rural and regional Australia. Or of course, you can check out the about section on our website.

Jenn Donovan:

This episode is of course brought to you by our marketplace, Spend With Us Buy From a Bush Business, which you can find at www.spendwithus.com.au. It’s an online marketplace for rural and regional small businesses, and we’re currently supporting almost 1000 small businesses on that platform. And of course, our Facebook group Buy From a Bush Business, has just ticked over 310,000 members, so we are supporting hundreds of thousands of members on that Facebook group. Or, in that Facebook group I should say. We’d love you to check us out and support rural Australia, and even recommend this podcast or our Facebook group, or our marketplace to a friend or a family member so they can check it out, too.

Jenn Donovan:

On this episode today, I have Robyn Carmichael, an ex-finance opal miner from rural Queensland. Yeah, she went from high rise, or high contact finance, to being an opal mining. Her business is called Robyn Dale Creations. I cannot tell you how much I loved this episode. One of the advantages of doing a podcast like this is the pre-chat and the post chat, and boy did we have lots to chat about. I absolutely love her story. I would never like her life, because I hate camping and maybe just a tiny little bit precious, but I do love the idea of her life. Opal mining and gold mining TV shows are some of my closest favorite shows to watch. I loved her message about finding your passion, and the story perhaps that it just might be very left of field of where you think your passion might be.

Jenn Donovan:

I know you’re going to love this episode with Robyn as well, so go and grab a cuppa and listen in to my chat with Robyn from Robyn Dale Creations.

Jenn Donovan:

Thank you so much, Robyn, for agreeing to come on the podcast. I’m really excited for everyone to hear your story, because I think it is a pretty awesome story. But first of all, welcome to the podcast.

Robyn Carmichael:

Thank you. Hi Jenn, it’s nice to be here today, so thanks for inviting me along to share my story.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah, no drama. Robyn, now you do live out in the middle of nowhere in Queensland. Can you tell our listeners a little bit about where you live?

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah. I’m actually an opal miner, I live 92 kilometers, it’s actually Southwest of Winton. Winton is Western-Central Queensland, and the closest bigger town to Winton is Longreach, which a lot of people may know Longreach as the home of Qantas. But actually, Winton is the home of Qantas, it’s where it actually started.

Jenn Donovan:

Oh, rivalry!

Robyn Carmichael:

[crosstalk 00:03:51], yeah. No, we have the Qantas Center there in Longreach as well. So for me to get to actual Longreach, I have to drive three hours to go there. That’s where I fly out of, if I have to fly back to Brisbane, or back home to my family because most of my family live in the coastal area of Queensland. Yeah, for me to get to Longreach is a three hour drive.

Robyn Carmichael:

Myself, I’m out on an opal mine with my partner and his family, his father and his stepmother. We live out there for eight months of the year, until it gets too hot. We left early December for four months, because if it gets around about 42, 43, up to 45 degrees at eight o’clock in the morning, and it’s a little bit hot to be out there working. We take that time off and we go and spend that time with our relative families. So that’s what we do, yes.

Jenn Donovan:

Oh, wow! I don’t even like camping, Robyn.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah. Well out there, we live in our dongers. We have a number of dongers that we have set up.

Jenn Donovan:

What’s a donger?

Robyn Carmichael:

They do have air conditioning.

Jenn Donovan:

You’re going to have to explain to everybody who doesn’t know what a donger is.

Robyn Carmichael:

A donger is a transportable little home. Some places you’ll see around, they have offices and they’ve just got a window and some floors. We make them into bedrooms, into kitchens, into showers, things like that. I actually have an outdoor shower, and if you ever come out there to visit me, I have a washing machine in the middle of the paddock and that’s where I wash from. We are totally remote, and I love every bit of it.

Robyn Carmichael:

I’ve worked, for many years, in a lot of the part of Australia in different cities, and for me going out to the bush again … I actually grew up in Roma, on a property in Roma. So for me, coming back to the bush has been wonderful. I’ve been there for four years now, and I wouldn’t change it for the world. Everyone that knows me, I’m the high heel wearing, dressed up girl, and I’ve gone out there and I’m in my boots, and out working in a pair of shorts and a singlet. I wouldn’t change it for the world, living out there. No matter how harsh it is and how dry it is, I love it. Yeah, it’s just something that I’m very passionate about.

Jenn Donovan:

What do you love the most? Seriously, that would be my worst nightmare, if someone dumped me out in the middle of nowhere, to be self-sufficient. I’m not quite sure I’d survive very much. What do you love the most?

Robyn Carmichael:

I love the remoteness. I love the fact that we can sit out there and have a drink of an afternoon, after we’ve had a hard day’s work, and look out and sit and watch a beautiful sunset. And then, of a nighttime, we can sit out and the stars, you see every star in that sky. It is just silent, there’s no traffic. Sometimes you might hear a semi going along the highway, that’s only a couple of kilometers way. But, it’s the that remoteness, it’s very rare that you hear that. It is, it’s just the peacefulness.

Robyn Carmichael:

You’re with your partner 24 hours a day, and I’m actually very lucky I’ve got someone I can live with and enjoy his company and we never fight. So for us being in that area, it’s just great. We just love the remoteness of it. Yes.

Jenn Donovan:

I can actually understand that. We live on a farm. I certainly wouldn’t call it remote, but we do live on a farm. I love the peacefulness, I love the stars and everything like that. And lots of visitors who come out to the farm say just that, how peaceful it is, and how beautiful the sky is that you don’t see, even in small towns. With all the lights, you don’t necessarily see that. So I can understand that bit. The other bit? Maybe not so much. But that bit, I can definitely get, definitely get.

Robyn Carmichael:

Well, the flies you wouldn’t like.

Jenn Donovan:

No.

Robyn Carmichael:

You’ve got to wear a fly hat all the time. And insects, and those that don’t like snakes and spiders, and dingoes. But as I said, I had the pleasure of growing up in rural areas, so to me, it’s just second nature to me. You see some things, and you have some funny things happen to you. You’ve got a great life. As I said, I wouldn’t change.

Jenn Donovan:

That’s lovely. That is very, very lovely to hear. So you are out there in an opal mine, so tell us how you got into that. That’s not something someone wakes up someday and goes, “Oh, I might be able to buy an opal mine.” How does that look? And, how different does it look from what we see on TV? Come on, whoever watches those opal mining shows, does it look like that?

Robyn Carmichael:

Well, no. Yeah, it does in some ways. It is a very hard life. Well, I can’t say … It is, it is a hard life. I shouldn’t say it is, but it is.

Jenn Donovan:

Harsh, maybe.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yes. Well, my story is I was in finance for 20 years, and as I said I’ve worked all over Australia. I’ve had the pleasure of being one of those people that could move around. So quite a few years ago, I was living in Adelaide and I was going through a lot of hard things, you do have a very stressful life being in finance as well. I met this gentleman, and I ended up moving back to the Sunshine Coast to be with him. And then, six years ago I lost him to cancer.

Robyn Carmichael:

My current partner, I had actually met through him. We went out for a trip about eight to nine years ago, and we went out and surprised them out in the opal fields because my partner was good friends with my current partner, and that’s where I first met this man. We got on really well, right from word go. And then, when my partner passed away, my current partner came looking for me. And we started dating, and we’ve been together for just on five years now.

Robyn Carmichael:

He used to come home and see me every few months, on the Sunshine Coast, and see how stressed I was in my life. And he’d come home one day and he said, “You’re going to resign, and you’re going to come out opal mining with me.” I just went, “Okay. I’m going from a very well paid position to nothing.” So I headed off out to the opal fields. I resigned from the bank, and I went out to the opal fields. And as I said, I loved every moment of it, and I would never, ever go back to being on a job that stressed me that much.

Robyn Carmichael:

Then, while I was out there I did some mining him. I do, if he needs me helping him, I go off and I do some mining. I don’t like the big machines, I’ve been on them twice and I refuse to get back on the big excavators because they scare me. And then, I was bored and I said, “Can you teach me how to cut and polish?” So he started to teach me how to cut and polish the opal. And from there, I thought well, I can make things out of this, and I started with handbag charms, was my first piece that I ever made was a handbag charm. And then from there, I actually put it into learning how to wire wrap. I bought a book, and I self-taught how to wire wrap. That was three years ago.

Robyn Carmichael:

In the last two years, I have won competitions for my wire wrapping. I won an opal mining, it was an opal competition on best jewelry design for a person who actually wasn’t a jeweler, and I won. I took that out the first year, and then last year I came in second. I have received high honors for my jewelry as well. It’s just blossomed from there, I’ve actually found my passion.

Jenn Donovan:

Wow.

Robyn Carmichael:

For me, it’s all about passion and enjoying what you do. If you don’t enjoy what you do, then you shouldn’t be there. That’s how I’ve come about it all. Yes, but my partner’s been out there for 30 years. He’s been an opal miner for a very long time.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah. Clearly, it’s in his blood.

Robyn Carmichael:

He loves it.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah.

Robyn Carmichael:

Oh yes. Yeah.

Jenn Donovan:

But isn’t that funny, how we have to go through all these different things to find our passion. And yet, if someone had said to you 20 years ago that your passion would making opal jewelry, you probably would have laughed at them.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yes.

Jenn Donovan:

Ferociously.

Robyn Carmichael:

I agree with that. And, I still have friends who know me very well and they just look at me and go, “Wow.”

Jenn Donovan:

Who are you?

Robyn Carmichael:

“I just can’t believe you’re doing that.” Yeah, “Who is this person who is happy, and not stressed, and looks really good?”

Jenn Donovan:

Nice, that is such a great story. I just love the leap of faith. Just yeah, okay. I’m sure it wasn’t as quick as you made it out to send, but it was definitely a leap of faith.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah, it was. It wasn’t and it was. Since losing my partner six years ago, I think having a leap of faith and doing it straight away, if you make that decision to just do it and don’t procrastinate, or you’ll never do it. That’s why it did actually happen so quick, because I was told in the January, and by April I’d gone. I’d packed up my whole home on the Sunshine Coast, put it all in storage, rented out my place, and I was gone. That’s what I mean, I think being out in the bush is actually in my blood as well. For me, it’s not hard to go back there. Growing up in the bush I loved, so going back to the bush was nothing for me.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah.

Robyn Carmichael:

And, I could go walk for 20 Ks if I want.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah. On my other podcast that I have, my marketing podcast Small Business Made Simple, one of my most popular episodes was when I talked about the year of saying yes. I just said yes, let’s do it type of thing. Wasn’t allowed to think about it, just had to say yes. Of course, you had to be very careful who you told you were having the year of saying yes to, otherwise they might take advantage of you. But, it’s been one of my most popular episodes. Yeah, I think it’s that thing of just going yeah, okay I’m in.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah, just do it.

Jenn Donovan:

I’ll figure it out later.

Robyn Carmichael:

Don’t be scared to do it. You can always change.

Jenn Donovan:

That’s right. That is right, you can always go back, you can always go back.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yes.

Jenn Donovan:

So you do live very rurally, has the drought affected you at all? Or, your township of Winton? Or are you just normally a dry, arid place anyway?

Robyn Carmichael:

It is a very dry, arid place, but Winton actually, last year we had our dry spell. And then, we had all that rain, it was all over the news, a lot of the cattle died. Because we had so much flooding, thousands, and thousands, and thousands of head of cattle were killed because of the amount of water that actually came through. And, knowing a lot of the farmers, and I actually do live on a station …

Robyn Carmichael:

Even though we’re on a mine, we actually do live on a station out there. We could see cattle being shipped in and out all the time, because there’s just no food for them. They’re moving them on agistment all around the area. And then, when the rains did come and we had a lot of grass, a lot of other places even through to WA were asking the local farmers if they could bring their cattle out on agistment, so that they could feed their cattle. You would see them walking on the highways, and they’re just trying to get food into the animals and it’s really sad.

Robyn Carmichael:

But for us, on the mine, we rely on the water. We have two small dams that we use, we actually clear, we have a little section that we pump into, and we clear it into clear water. That’s our showering, and washing our clothes, and for our garden. And then, we have tank water and that’s our living water. If we don’t get rain, we can’t go out and we cannot mine. This is what a lot of people don’t realize, water is our source. If we do not have that rain, then we are stuck and that’s our industry gone. We’re lucky again, we’ve been watching the weather. We’re heading out probably in two weeks, back out to the mine. So everyone’s [inaudible 00:15:47], I’m currently away with my mom. We will be heading back out, and we know we’ve had plenty of good rain so we know our dams are going to full and we know our water tanks are going to be full. That will actually get us through for another year.

Robyn Carmichael:

It is so important that we get our rain, and everyone does get their rain. I have seen the dryness in the areas. If you do come out there, it is a very arid area, yes.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah. And look, water is the source, isn’t it, of everything.

Robyn Carmichael:

Oh yeah.

Jenn Donovan:

Do you need water for opal mining itself, or just for living?

Robyn Carmichael:

Not the mining, we do need water for cutting. You actually cut your opals with water. If you try and do them dry, you’ll actually destroy the opal so very important that you cut the opal under the water. What we have in Queensland, people don’t realize, opal is different in every stay. So in Queensland, we have what’s called boulder opal, and some of those boulders can be a couple of ton in weight. You actually have to cut those boulders up to get just a little seam of opal through it. With that, we use what’s your tilling stores, and that all has to have water through it as well. Otherwise, you could crack it and completely destroy it. It is a very soft stone, so you need to actually be able to know how to cut it properly. I’ve seen someone use dry cutting and just completely destroy the stone. It is very important to us, yes.

Jenn Donovan:

I didn’t realize. Well, I suppose it makes sense, I’ve probably never thought about it. Now, I’m meeting it on the period, but hadn’t really thought about the different regions having different types of opal, and different ways of finding it and that sort of thing. That’s very interesting.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah. You can go underground or you can open cut. We’re an open cut mine, which means that we have machines that actually cut into the wall. And then, we regenerate behind us. So it’s a big part of us as open miners, that we ensure that we regenerate through and that’s actually part of our contract, that we have to bring the land back to how we found it. It’s quite interesting, watching the regrowth come through behind as you do it as well. New trees, new everything. It’s really important that we do keep our environment the way it is. And that’s what a lot of people don’t realize as well, that we actually do have a lot of work behind us, and a lot of governmental rules behind us as well, that we have to ensure we follow.

Robyn Carmichael:

But with us out there, we are both open cut and underground out in Winton. We have some underground miners, and we also have mostly open cut. Then, you go through to Lightning Ridge, which is once again it is both, but most of it is underground mining. And then, through to South Australia, where it is just about all underground mining. Yes, and they actually live underground there as well. That’s where your different opals come from. Yeah, different types of opal come through all different states.

Jenn Donovan:

How very interesting.

Robyn Carmichael:

It is.

Jenn Donovan:

It is very interesting.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yes.

Jenn Donovan:

Robyn, we’ve met through the group that I created, Buy From a Bush Business. First of all, thank you very much for participating in that and supporting that. But prior to that, where were you selling these beautiful creations that you were making?

Robyn Carmichael:

I have a website that I started up myself, and I’m not that savvy on doing websites so it wasn’t very successful. But, I had my own website which was a Wix website. Robyn Dale Creations, I started it three years ago on this beautiful little website, which I’ve been lucky and had a lovely lady fix for me recently so it now looks more fresher. And, that’s mainly where I’ve been selling it, but I would also go to market stalls.

Jenn Donovan:

Nice.

Robyn Carmichael:

Every year, we have an opal festival out in Winton, every July. And, it’s a big festival where we have buyers from all over the world come, but we also have a lot of people come out and visit us. So for those that don’t know where Winton is, it’s dinosaur country. We actually have big dinosaur centers out in Winton, so a lot of people come through Winton coming to see the dinosaurs, but then they realize we have beautiful opal, too. That’s where I mainly sell.But, when I do come back through the summer, I also do stalls throughout Queensland or anywhere I might be. I’ll set up stall somewhere and sell it.

Robyn Carmichael:

But, since Buy From the Bush has come on, it’s been just wonderful for me to get my name out there and my product out there.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah, right. How have you gone with the Buy From the Bush Business, how have you gone with sales? Have you had a good response?

Robyn Carmichael:

I’ve had a wonderful response. In my first day that I put my first pieces up, I sold every one of those pieces.

Jenn Donovan:

Wow.

Robyn Carmichael:

Since then, I’ve had orders coming through. So I’ve got a lot of people sending me, “Can I make this, can I make that?” I don’t make everything because mine is all wire wrapped, as I said I don’t solder. So some of the things people are asking me to make, I just can’t do. But soldering is on my list of things to learn, so that will be the next thing I teach myself.

Jenn Donovan:

Yes, beautiful.

Robyn Carmichael:

Keep watching everybody, keep watching.

Robyn Carmichael:

And then for me, it’s just been word of mouth as well. Just the feedback I’ve been getting is just absolutely wonderful, wonderful to see. As I said, I’m very happy to take orders. As long as I can do it, I’m very, very happy to help people out with anything. I’m actually in the middle of working on about three orders at the moment, so to me that’s just wonderful. My business has really, really expanded and my following on my Facebook site has been wonderful as well. I can’t say thank you enough to this beautiful, beautiful group.

Jenn Donovan:

Yeah, it is a wonderful group. We need to stop calling it a group, we need to call it a community because it really is a beautiful little community. Where, even if people can’t afford to buy, whether it’s opals, or knitted booties, or whatever that looks like and everything in between, they’re so complimentary, and they’re so uplifting. It’s just gorgeous.

Robyn Carmichael:

It is, it is. And, I’ve bought two or three items already myself out of the community, it’s just been wonderful. The first thing I bought was a lip gloss from a little girl who’s 15 selling lip glosses, so my mom and I both bought lip glosses. We fought over who got the watermelon and who got the vanilla, so mom won out with the vanilla, I got my watermelon so it’s all good. Her lip glosses are beautiful, and I’ve been promoting them to other people. I’m one of six children, so I’ve been telling my sibling all about this group as well, and the community as a whole. I’ve had them sign up as well, just to have a look and follow.

Robyn Carmichael:

The artwork, everything, I can’t say enough about it.

Jenn Donovan:

It is, it is gorgeous.

Jenn Donovan:

With your opals, I do have to ask because obviously, you are opal miners. Clearly, you don’t get to make your jewelry out of everything you find.

Robyn Carmichael:

No.

Jenn Donovan:

So how does that work, how do you decide what pieces you get to do under Robyn Dale Creations, and what other bits get to be sold elsewhere I guess?

Robyn Carmichael:

With the opal, we sell it in the rough. We have buyers from all over the world come out, and they buy, I’d say, 99% of our opal goes to them. What we mean by the rough is it’s not cut, it’s still raw in the stone. We prepare that, and then that is bought by other people who then make it into the jewelry. And that’s, as I said, all over the world.

Robyn Carmichael:

Then for us, we’ll have a little bit at the end of the year. And, between the four of us, we decide who’s going to be doing what and we split that up between the two of us, my partner and I and his father and his stepmom. And then, we actually work from there on cutting it. I won’t say it’s low grade because it’s not, some of it is just what we haven’t had a chance to sell. We try and keep some of the product for ourselves, so that we can cut and make our jewelry out of it. Or, make stones and sell our stones as they are.

Robyn Carmichael:

That’s what we try and do, but our main business is that we actually have to sell the opal. And, a lot of people don’t realize it’s not all the time. Some people think okay, opal miners, yeah you’re an opal miner, you’ve got a big income. Well no, that’s not true. We can go two or three years without finding any opal, and we struggle. We struggle like every other human in this world. And if we’re lucky to have a good find, then we have to remember about the hard times. We have to prepare ourselves, and make sure we’ve got our little nest eggs behind us like every other person in this world, to ensure that we aren’t struggling throughout the years that we don’t find the stone. A lot of people, they think you can just walk up and pull an opal out of the ground. I’m sorry, no it doesn’t happen that way.

Jenn Donovan:

Oh come on, Robyn, you’re spoiling it for everybody.

Robyn Carmichael:

Sometimes you can be lucky and find that stone, but 99% of it you actually have to work very hard to find. Yeah, it’s not just [crosstalk 00:24:33].

Jenn Donovan:

You sound a bit like it’s just another form of farming isn’t it?

Robyn Carmichael:

Yes.

Jenn Donovan:

Here on the farm, some years we have cracker seasons with good yields, and maybe even good prices. And then other years, it’s not so good. Yeah, it just sounds like another form of farming.

Robyn Carmichael:

Yeah. What’s the saying? “Some days are diamonds,” well, some days are opals.

Jenn Donovan:

Ah, love it. Good one.

Jenn Donovan:

Robyn, just before we wind up, this has been a great conversation. But, just before we wind up, what advice would you give to someone? I perhaps won’t ask if they want to go opal mining, that might be a bit niche. But, what advice would you give to someone who is, perhaps, thinking about following a dream, or thinking about doing something a little bit different in their life?

Robyn Carmichael:

My advice is, this is from the heart, you just go for it. Don’t have any ifs or buts. Have a good look at it, and work towards your dream, and work towards a goal. If you think about it, and you ask about it, and you manifest it, it will come and it will happen. It doesn’t happen overnight everybody, I’m sorry. I’m still learning, I’m still making my dream come true. My goal is to one day have all my jewelry being sold all over the world, so that is slowly starting to happen. But, I’ve been working very hard at this for three years now, and I wake up every day and just feel blessed that I have chosen a path that I’m happy with.

Robyn Carmichael:

I think that’s the key. If you’re looking for your happiness, then go for it. Just have a go. And, always as questions. I’ve got people who email me, on numerous occasions, asking me where I learned how to do things, how do I do it, where do I find things. I’m very happy to share. And that’s the whole beauty of it, you share, you’ll get back. I think that’s what everyone who wants to start something new, just do it guys, life’s too short and you don’t want to wake up and regret it.

Jenn Donovan:

No. No, some very sound advice from someone who’s done just that, that’s lovely. And, I 100% agree.

Jenn Donovan:

If you’ve said something on this podcast that has really made someone think, or they’re dying to have a look at your beautiful creations, where can they go to have a look at your jewelry?

Robyn Carmichael:

Well, they can have a look on Buy From the Bush, but they can also go to Robyn Dale Creations. That’s just robyndalecreations.com, so that’s where you will find me.

Jenn Donovan:

Beautiful, beautiful. All right. Thank you so much, Robyn, for coming on. This has been a really good interview, I’ve never got to talk to an opal miner before. And, I will now watch the opal mining TV show with a different eye altogether.

Robyn Carmichael:

No, still enjoy it guys, still enjoy it. You’ve got to have a laugh.

Jenn Donovan:

I’m not that sure I should even admit that I watch those shows on a podcast, but anyway, regardless.

Robyn Carmichael:

It shows you’re real and you’re a human.

Jenn Donovan:

Oh I don’t know, I just find them interesting. Oh, beautiful. Thank you so much for supporting me in this podcast, but also through the Buy From a Bush Business group, it’s been great. Yeah, so lovely to meet yet another member.

Robyn Carmichael:

Thank you, thank you for having me, and I look forward to hearing everyone else’s stories as well.

Jenn Donovan:

Beautiful, thanks.

Robyn Carmichael:

No worries.

Jenn Donovan:

I really hope you enjoyed that episode, and you are inspired to visit Robyn or perhaps go gold mining, or sorry, opal mining yourself, because I certainly am. I can’t wait to head to Winton, and give her a buzz, and catch up with her. Or, check out all her amazing jewelry.

Jenn Donovan:

Thanks again for listening in. If you haven’t checked out our marketplace, Spend With Us, then head to all the Ws spendwithus.com.au, and support other rural and regional Australian small businesses on that platform. Of course, don’t forget to subscribe to this podcast, as we are dropping more episodes and we’d love you to listen to all of the stories of life and business in rural Australia. And of course, we’d love a rating and a review, if you have a few little moments as well. But anyway, I will see you again next time, on episode eight with another amazing story I know you’re going to love.

 

 

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